Home :: Contact ::  Web ::  A.I.R.
AIR Rip :: Christ Episcopal Church
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Photos 16-26 by Lou Fancy Photos 27-30 of the demolition
Christ Episcopal Church

A video about part of a thesis project. A small tour group examines the remains of the building through the story-telling of a visitor on a recording.

reason for demolition

Having sat vacant for more than twenty years, the structure has deteriorated and maintenance is required before it can be used again. While the Victorian brownstone and brick building still retains its picturesque profile and distinctive detailing, its condition continues to get worse. The Christ Episcopal Church made the Providence Preservation Society’s Ten Most Endangered List in 1999, and PPS has worked with the church in the past, but renewed fears about the building’s status returned the structure to PPS’s Ten Most Endangered List in 2003.

In early January 2006, the structure was finally taken down.

 

History prepared by Josh Jackson for the Providence Preservation Society

Despite facing discrimination and even persecution in colonial New England, by the nineteenth century the Episcopalian Church had become an integral part of New England’s cultural landscape. The Church also made an impact on the physical landscape, contributing greatly to the development of ecclesiastical architecture in Rhode Island by introducing and popularizing the English Gothic vernacular.

With its fine brickwork, asymmetrical massing and stately corner tower, the Christ Episcopal Church (1888) represents a fine example of English Gothic Revival. Established in 1864, the congregation erected a frame chapel on the site in 1867 which they moved across Eddy street when construction on the present sanctuary began. Designed by the prolific William R. Walker and Son, Christ Episcopal Church was home to the congregation for more than a century until dwindling numbers forced the church to close its doors in 1981.

Having sat vacant for more than twenty years, the structure has deteriorated and maintenance is required before it can be used again. While the Victorian brownstone and brick building still retains its picturesque profile and distinctive detailing, its condition continues to get worse. The Christ Episcopal Church made the Ten Most Endangered List in 1999, and PPS has worked with the church in the past, but renewed fears about the building’s status have returned the structure to PPS’s Ten Most Endangered List. Hope remains that a homeless congregation could rehabilitate the building, but the the fact that the church was originally built for religious purposes does not preclude its adaptation for any number of community or neighborhood uses.

Lisa Bianco Jan 23 2017 I remember going by this church when we would pick up my grandmother from work. She worked on Broad Street. Her old landlord belonged to this church and it was a Christ Church in God Church for some time afterwards

Sheila Erice Nov 13 2015 I was baptist and received my confirmation in this church. I lived directly across the street at 914 Eddy St. and participated in many of the after school programs, summer camps, etc. that was freely available through the charitable offerings from the church. My family moved in the 70s; but when driving on 95 South you could view this church’s beauty. It broke my heart to see it gone. Out of habit; I find myself still looking.

Bill Harrington Sep 6 2015 I went to this church. Father Williams was our priest. Confirmed in this church. My Father was friends with John Demming. At that time we had one black family in the church, there last name was Washburn, very nice people and with whom I was friends. We went to Oxford street school. We lived at 216 Ocean St. At the church I sang in the choir and served at the alter. Met my first girlfriend, sister of my friend Thomas Hepburn, Georgina. We used to ride our bikes to Roger Williams Park. Other friends, Barry Lynch, Billy McDermet.

ed Apr 3 2009 The proceeds from the sale of the church have been deposited with the RI Foundation to establish the “Lawrence, Allen, Singletary Scholarship”

Sandy Connor This is a significant church in the Episcopal Diocese of RI. A march is held on Aug. 14 each year to commemorate Jonathan Daniels who served at that church in the early 60’s. Jonathan Daniels was killed protecting a 17 yr. old, Ruby Sales, while protesting for Civil Rights in 1965 in Alabama. The march begins at Christ Church and ends at Church of the Epiphany on Potters Ave.

P Babbidge This fine building designed by William R. Walker and Son can rest in peace along with another Walker design, the Manton Avenue Grammar School which was also built in 1888. It was located at 917 Manton on the corner with Fruit Hill Ave. Demolished some time in 2005 and now the lot houses a brand new video store. I work across the street at the Stop & Shop and my heart bleeds every time I cross that intersection, but I do get a smile to see that someone further up Fruit Hill Ave has recycled the school’s wrought iron fencing in their own yard. The loss of this fine church hurts even more than the loss of the school, and the pics of the demo make me cry because it looks like the demo crew wasn’t too keen on destroying the church either. What a terrible shame.

Sandra L. Dawley For more than 5 years I have driven past this beautiful church. The architecture was simple beautiful. It was sad to see it deteriorate and I wondered about the congregation who originally attended and what the name of the church was. I was so glad to see it on this website and so sad to see it go. I am glad that pictures were included of its interior. It truly must have been a beautiful House of Worship.

Tom Carroll I grew up at 845 Eddy St. We played around this church, though as good Irish Catholics we went to St. Michaels. The first non-Catholics I knew were the Demings who went to Christ Episcopal. I’m sorry to see it gone.

The information about each building grows as visitors let us know about their experiences. Did you or a member of your family work here? Did you grow up near it as a child? Let us know. All entries will be moderated and may be posted in an edited form. We will use your name unless you tell us otherwise. We will not make your email public.

Color 1 Color 2 Color 3